Chemistry of the Mediterranean diet [electronic resource] / Amelia Martins Delgado, Maria Daniel Vaz Almeida, Salvatore Parisi ; [photographs and cover illustration by Tobias N. Wassermann].

By: Delgado, Amelia Martins [Author]Contributor(s): Vaz Almeida, Maria Daniel [Author] | Parisi, Salvatore, 1970- [Author] | Wassermann, Tobias N [ill.] | EBSCOhost (online database)Material type: TextTextLanguage: English Publication details: Switzerland : Springer, 2017Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 259 p.) : col. ill., maps, charts, photosISBN: 9783319293707 (eBook); 9783319293684Subject(s): Diet -- Mediterranean Region | Diet therapy | Health -- Nutritional aspects | Food -- Nutritional aspects | Food -- Composition | Food -- Analysis | Olive oil | Olive oil -- Analysis | Olive | Plant polyphenols | Vegetables in human nutrition | Seafood | Dairy products | Milk in human nutrition | Eggs | Fruit | Nuts | Aromatic plants | Meat | Wine and wine making | Fishes | Tomatoes | Pumpkin | Parsley | Oregano | Basil | Saffron crocus | Fennel | Garlic | Onions | Wheat | Rice | Potatoes | Peas | Beans | Lentils | Chickpea | Grapes | Citrus | Apples | Cherry | Fig | Walnut | Hazelnuts | Chestnut | Almond | Butter | Cheese | Feta cheese | Chickens | Coffee | Tea | Perrotis College -- General Education programGenre/Form: Electronic books DDC classification: EBK 615.854 Online resources: EBSCOhost - Full text online Connect to eBook
Partial contents:
PART I. INTRODUCTION TO THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET : 1. The Mediterranean Diet: What Is It? - - 2. Food and Nutrient Features of the Mediterranean Diet. - - 3. Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet.
PART II. FACTS ON THE COMPOSITION OF 'MEDITERRANEAN FOODS' : 4. Olive Oil and Table Olives : 4.1 Olive oil and table olives: an introduction. - 4.2 Olive oil : Polyphenols, squalene, sterols, β-carotene, α-tocopherol, waxes, chlorophylls and related pigments. - 4.3 Table olives. - - 5. Green and Other Vegetable Foods. - 5.1 Vegetable foods: an introduction. - 5.2 Leafy vegetables and analogues: cabbage (Brassica oleracea), turnip (Brassica rapa subsp. rapa), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pumpkin (Cucurbita spp.). - 5.3 Wild leafy vegetables and weeds : watercress (Nasturtium officinale), purslane (Portulaca oleracea), borage (Borago officinalis). - 5.4 Aromatic plants and spices : parsley (Petroselinum crispum), oregano (Origanum vulgare), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), basil (Ocimum basilicum), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), saffron (Crocus sativus), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), garlic (Allium sativum), onion (Allium cepa). - 5.5 Starchy foods : wheat (Triticum aestivum; Triticum durum), rice (Oryza sativa), potato (Solanum tuberosum). - 5.6 Pulses : common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), broad bean (Vicia faba), lentil (Lens culinaris), pea (Pisum sativum), chickpea (Cicer arietinum). - 5.7 Fresh fruits : grape (Vitis vinifera), citrus (Citrus spp.), apple (Malus domestica), cherry (Prunus avium), fig (Ficus carica), dates (Phoenix dactylifera), blackberry (Rubus fruticosus). - 5.8 Nuts : walnut (Juglans regia), hazelnuts (Corylus avellana), chestnut (Castanea sativa), almond (Prunus dulcis), pistachio (Pistacia vera), pine nut (Pinus pinea). - 6. Milk and Dairy Products : 6.1 Milk and dairy products: an introduction. - 6.2 Gut microbiome. - 6.3 Milk. - 6.4 Butter. - 6.5 Cheese : gorgonzola (Italy), queso de Murcia (Spain), queijo Serra da Estrela (Portugal), feta (Greece), mozzarella di Bufala Campana (Italy). - 6.6 Yoghurt : regular plain yoghurt, strawberry Greek-type yoghurt (Oikos). - - 7. Fish, Meat and Other Animal Protein Sources : 7.1 Fish, meat and other animal protein sources: an introduction. - 7.2 Seafood : tuna (Thunnus alalunga), sardine (Sardina pilchardus), anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus), codfish (Gadus morhua), cephalopods, bivalves, crustaceans. - 7.3 Meat: poultry (chicken, turkey, duck), ruminants (bovine, lamb and goat), pork, traditionally processed meat. - 7.4 Eggs. - - 8. Infusions and Wines : 8.1 Infusions and wines: an introduction. - 8.2 Coffee. - 8.3 Tea and herbal infusions : black tea, green tea, herbal infusions. - 8.4 Wine : white wine, red wine.
PART III. THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET: CONCLUSIONS : 9. Concluding remarks.
Summary: "Have you ever wondered what makes the Mediterranean diet so healthy? Do you enjoy olives, tomatoes, Chourico and Mozzarella, basil, rosemary and oregano, grapes, figs, and dates; and would you like to learn more about the substances they contain? Then this book is for you! The Mediterranean diet, designated as an 'Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity', has a reputation of being particularly beneficial to your health and for reducing the risk of diseases like cardiovascular disorders. Read this book to find out which chemical compounds contribute to these health benefits. Typical ingredients of the Mediterranean diet include olive oils, fresh and dried vegetables and fruits, cereals, moderate amounts of fish, dairy and meat, and various condiments and spices, typically accompanied by wine and infusions. The book will introduce you to the most typical ingredients, providing information about their use in Mediterranean cuisine and explaining more about the healthy substances they contain - from their chemistry to their occurrence in the foods and the resulting intake. Summarizing important facts and data from available scientific literature, this book even gives recommendations for guidelines to a healthy diet - guidelines that are becoming more and more important. In recent years, it has been observed that nutritional habits in the geographical area have started to deviate further and further away from the typical Mediterranean nutritional pattern, representing an alarming trend that this book also critically addresses, since the WHO has reported increases in obesity and malnutrition in the Mediterranean area. Illustrations of important chemical compound structures, as well as appetizing photos of select ingredients for Mediterranean dishes, accompany the text." ~ from the Library of Congress online catalog.
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Ebook Ebook "Dimitris & Aliki Perrotis" Central Library

Κεντρική Βιβλιοθήκη της Αμερικανικής Γεωργικής Σχολής και του Κολεγίου Περρωτής.

"Dimitris & Aliki Perrotis" Central Library

Κεντρική Βιβλιοθήκη της Αμερικανικής Γεωργικής Σχολής και του Κολεγίου Περρωτής.

Perrotis College - General Education EBK 615.854 Del (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available Available only through the Library network. 11000144

Mediterranean Diet : Science & Culture (GE) Spring semester

Total reservations: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index.

PART I. INTRODUCTION TO THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET : 1. The Mediterranean Diet: What Is It? - - 2. Food and Nutrient Features of the Mediterranean Diet. - - 3. Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet.

PART II. FACTS ON THE COMPOSITION OF 'MEDITERRANEAN FOODS' : 4. Olive Oil and Table Olives : 4.1 Olive oil and table olives: an introduction. - 4.2 Olive oil : Polyphenols, squalene, sterols, β-carotene, α-tocopherol, waxes, chlorophylls and related pigments. - 4.3 Table olives. - - 5. Green and Other Vegetable Foods. - 5.1 Vegetable foods: an introduction. - 5.2 Leafy vegetables and analogues: cabbage (Brassica oleracea), turnip (Brassica rapa subsp. rapa), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pumpkin (Cucurbita spp.). - 5.3 Wild leafy vegetables and weeds : watercress (Nasturtium officinale), purslane (Portulaca oleracea), borage (Borago officinalis). - 5.4 Aromatic plants and spices : parsley (Petroselinum crispum), oregano (Origanum vulgare), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), basil (Ocimum basilicum), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), saffron (Crocus sativus), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), garlic (Allium sativum), onion (Allium cepa). - 5.5 Starchy foods : wheat (Triticum aestivum; Triticum durum), rice (Oryza sativa), potato (Solanum tuberosum). - 5.6 Pulses : common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), broad bean (Vicia faba), lentil (Lens culinaris), pea (Pisum sativum), chickpea (Cicer arietinum). - 5.7 Fresh fruits : grape (Vitis vinifera), citrus (Citrus spp.), apple (Malus domestica), cherry (Prunus avium), fig (Ficus carica), dates (Phoenix dactylifera), blackberry (Rubus fruticosus). - 5.8 Nuts : walnut (Juglans regia), hazelnuts (Corylus avellana), chestnut (Castanea sativa), almond (Prunus dulcis), pistachio (Pistacia vera), pine nut (Pinus pinea). - 6. Milk and Dairy Products : 6.1 Milk and dairy products: an introduction. - 6.2 Gut microbiome. - 6.3 Milk. - 6.4 Butter. - 6.5 Cheese : gorgonzola (Italy), queso de Murcia (Spain), queijo Serra da Estrela (Portugal), feta (Greece), mozzarella di Bufala Campana (Italy). - 6.6 Yoghurt : regular plain yoghurt, strawberry Greek-type yoghurt (Oikos). - - 7. Fish, Meat and Other Animal Protein Sources : 7.1 Fish, meat and other animal protein sources: an introduction. - 7.2 Seafood : tuna (Thunnus alalunga), sardine (Sardina pilchardus), anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus), codfish (Gadus morhua), cephalopods, bivalves, crustaceans. - 7.3 Meat: poultry (chicken, turkey, duck), ruminants (bovine, lamb and goat), pork, traditionally processed meat. - 7.4 Eggs. - - 8. Infusions and Wines : 8.1 Infusions and wines: an introduction. - 8.2 Coffee. - 8.3 Tea and herbal infusions : black tea, green tea, herbal infusions. - 8.4 Wine : white wine, red wine.

PART III. THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET: CONCLUSIONS : 9. Concluding remarks.

"Have you ever wondered what makes the Mediterranean diet so healthy? Do you enjoy olives, tomatoes, Chourico and Mozzarella, basil, rosemary and oregano, grapes, figs, and dates; and would you like to learn more about the substances they contain? Then this book is for you! The Mediterranean diet, designated as an 'Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity', has a reputation of being particularly beneficial to your health and for reducing the risk of diseases like cardiovascular disorders. Read this book to find out which chemical compounds contribute to these health benefits. Typical ingredients of the Mediterranean diet include olive oils, fresh and dried vegetables and fruits, cereals, moderate amounts of fish, dairy and meat, and various condiments and spices, typically accompanied by wine and infusions. The book will introduce you to the most typical ingredients, providing information about their use in Mediterranean cuisine and explaining more about the healthy substances they contain - from their chemistry to their occurrence in the foods and the resulting intake. Summarizing important facts and data from available scientific literature, this book even gives recommendations for guidelines to a healthy diet - guidelines that are becoming more and more important. In recent years, it has been observed that nutritional habits in the geographical area have started to deviate further and further away from the typical Mediterranean nutritional pattern, representing an alarming trend that this book also critically addresses, since the WHO has reported increases in obesity and malnutrition in the Mediterranean area. Illustrations of important chemical compound structures, as well as appetizing photos of select ingredients for Mediterranean dishes, accompany the text." ~ from the Library of Congress online catalog.

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